Morpho-phonological Structure of Sound Feminine Plural: Revisited

Bassil Mashaqba, Anas Huneety

Abstract


This work investigates an unusual and intriguing concatenative morpho-phonological process, which occurs in a Jordanian variety as spoken by Ahl Al-Jabal Bedouin, the native dwellers of North East Badia of Jordan. The work shows that the voiceless plosive /t/ undergoes deletion if and only if it is part of the sound feminine plural morpheme -aat. In the pre-pausal position, /t/ deletion is further compensated by the reproduction of the voiceless glottal fricative [h]. Phonologically, the final voiceless plosive /t/, in the sound feminine plural -aat, undergoes debuccalization by which it loses its original place of articulation [alveolar] and moves to the glottis to surface as [guttural] [h]. Glottal closure (glottalization) takes place via a glottal fricative [h] rather than a glottal stop [ʔ]. The results of this paper further prove that the phonological status of sound feminine pluralization in Ahl Al-Jabal dialect is significantly motivated by morphology, an interesting piece of evidence that certain morphological patterns operate in the phonological component, or at least require phonological implications.


Keywords


Sound feminine plural (SFP), Morpho-phonology, Jordanian Arabic, Debuccalization, Glottalization

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7575/aiac.ijalel.v.6n.6p.115

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