Gabriel Garcia Marquez; The Significant Message of His Literary Discourse

Mohammad B. Aghaei

Abstract


Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s literary discourse actually portrays the destructive domination of colonial and imperialistic powers and civil wars that led to a series of insecurities and poverty in the community. In fact, whatever he has presented in his works is related to the realities of the continent that have been portrayed in his fictional world. In his works, every single line is a reference to a certain critical point in the history of Latin American continent and provides a magnifying glass for the reader to clearly conceptualize them. His works also represent the contemporary events that are frequently happening in the society.

 


Keywords


Latin America, figurative techniques, legacy of colonialism, violence, Liberal and Conservative parties

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7575/aiac.ijalel.v.4n.2p.185

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