Children Literature: A Potent Tool in the Hands of Absentee Parent(s)

Iyabode Omolara Akewo Daniel

Abstract


Children literature remains the focus of discussions among those concerned with the positive socialisation of children within the African society. However, how it can serve for the socialisation of children by the home has not been clearly understood. This paper discusses the tangible role children literature can play in the socialisation process. It specifically focuses on the way the absentee parent(s) can effectively use children literature as a tool of child training. It outlined the nature of children literature as it exists in the Nigerian society. It identified some important techniques such as didactism, journey motif, child abuse, characterisation, etc. which writers use to convey their messages in Nigerian children literature. It identified how writers use aesthetics to attract, keep and teach children the needed morality in the society. It concludes by outlining the way that the teacher/parent can effectively bring to life children literature to youngsters and thus engage it for positive socialisation of children within the African social milieu.

Keywords:  children literature, didactism, socialisation process, aesthetics, absentee parent(s)


Full Text:

PDF

References


Achebe, C. (1996). Chike and the river. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Adedeji, R. (1978). Stories my mother told me. Ibadan: HEB (Nig.) Plc.

Ashimole, E. O. (1992). Nigeria children’s literature and the challenges of social change. In C. Ikonne, E. Oko, & P. Onwudinjo (Eds.) Children and literature in Africa, (pp. 70-81). Ibadan: HEB.

Bench, P. (1989). Teasing our ‘the tiger’: Exploring teaching strategies with second-years. In M. Burton Enjoying texts, (pp. 31-40). Leckhampton: Stanley Thornes (Pub.) Ltd.

Daniel, I. O. (2010). Transliteration as communication weapon in Nigerian English. A paper presented at the 27th Annual Conference of the Nigerian English Studies Association (NESA) at the Covenant University, Ota, Ogun State between 2 and 5 November, 2010.

Daniel, I. O. A. (2014). Linguicide and Nigerian languages: Green economy as a strategic

platform for preservation. Accepted in Govinda Bhandari (Ed.) Green Economy (A book project by Research and Training Environment Professionals’ Training and Research Institute (EPTRI) Kathmandu, Nepal).

Eboh, E. I. (1987). Hero number one. Ibadan: University Press Plc.

Emecheta, B. (1974). Second class citizen. Glasgow: Fontana/Collins.

Encyclopaedia Britannica (2013). Children’s literature. Retrieved September 13, 2013 from

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/111289/childrens-literature

Head, B. (1977). The collector of treasures and other Botswana village tales. London: Heinemann.

Ikhigbonareme, E. B. (1992). Writing and publishing children’s literature: Problems and prospects. In C. Ikonne, E. Oko, & P. Onwudinjo (Eds.) Children and literature in Africa, (pp. 61-69). Ibadan: HEB.

Iroh, E. (1981). Without a silver spoon. Ibadan: Spectrum books Ltd.

Kachru, B. (1995). Foreword. In A. Bamgbose, A. Banjo & A. Thomas (Eds.) New Englishes: A West African perspective, (pp. iii-viii). Ibadan: Mosuro Publishers and Booksellers.

Library of Congress. (2013). Children literature. Retrieved September 13, 2013 from

http://www.loc.gov/acq/devpol/chi.pdf

Nwakoby, M. (1980). A lucky chance. Ibadan: Macmillan (Nig.) Publishing Ltd.

Ogu, C. J. (1985). Born to win. Ibadan: Macmillan (Nig.) Publishing Ltd.

Okafor, N. R. (1992). Technical and economic problems of writing and publishing children literature in Africa with particular reference to Nigeria. In C. Ikonne, E. Oko, & P. Onwudinjo (Eds.) Children and literature in Africa, (pp. 52-60). Ibadan: HEB.

Olagoke, D. O. (1962). The incorruptible judge. Ibadan: Evans Brothers (Nig.) Publishing Ltd.

Olagoke, D. O. (1962). The iroko-man and the wood-carver. Ibadan: Evans Brothers (Nig.) Publishing Ltd.

Onadipe, K. (1964). Sugar girl. Ibadan: African Universities Publishers.

Psychology Today. (2014). All about Parenting. Retrieved 17 July, 2014 from http://www.psychologytoday.com

Segun, M. D. (1992). Children’s literature in Africa: Problems and prospects. In C. Ikonne, E. Oko, & P. Onwudinjo (Eds.) Children and literature in Africa, (pp. 24-42). Ibadan: HEB.

Smith, J. A. (1953). Children’s verse. London: Faber and Faber Ltd.

Twist, C. (1989). ‘Through a fine web’: A post-structural approach to working on a text with younger pupils. In M. Burton Enjoying texts, (pp. 27-30). Leckhampton: Stanley Thornes (Pub.) Ltd.

Ukala, S. (1992). Fading away as morning stars? A review of the interest of Nigerian children in literary drama. In C. Ikonne, E. Oko, & P. Onwudinjo (Eds.) Children and literature in Africa, (pp. 79-106). Ibadan: HEB.

Vatsa, M. J. (1980). Children’s rhymes. Enugu: Fourth Dimension Publishing Company Ltd.


Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.




Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

2010-2019 (CC-BY) Australian International Academic Centre PTY.LTD.

Advances in Language and Literary Studies

You may require to add the 'aiac.org.au' domain to your e-mail 'safe list’ If you do not receive e-mail in your 'inbox'. Otherwise, you may check your 'Spam mail' or 'junk mail' folders.