Relationship between EFL Learners’ Autonomy and Speaking Strategies They Use in Conversation Classes

Hadi Salehi, Marziyeh Ebrahimi, Susan Sattar, Mohammad Shojaee

Abstract


The present study was conducted at Parsayan Language Institute in Isfahan, Iran. The students in pre- intermediate and intermediate classes were examined to investigate the relationship between degrees of learner autonomy, use of strategies for coping with speaking problems and the learners’ success in their speaking classes. To determine the degree of correlation among degree of learner autonomy, use of strategies for coping with speaking problems, and success in speaking classes, a validated questionnaire was distributed among 50 participants. The participants were required to self-report the strategies they use when they have problems during speaking English and to report their degree of learner autonomy as an English language learner by choosing one of the items on the questionnaire. The analysis of the obtained results showed that learners with low speaking grades were weaker in comparison with learners with high speaking grades during the use of strategies for coping with speaking problems on the whole. Similarly, learners with low speaking grades reported themselves as less autonomous when compared to high proficiency learners of English, although the difference was not significant between the group of learners in average speaking grade and high grade level. The first desirable endpoint should be some kind of modification on the curriculum of language teaching in terms of development of learner autonomy. More chances for developing autonomy should be offered to the students so that they would get used to it and be more successful in communication skills.

Keywords: Learner Autonomy, Strategies for Coping with Speaking Problems in English, Speaking Classes


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References


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