A Contrastive Analysis of the Notion of Marriage in the Nineteenth-Century American Literature and the Pre-Islamic Arabic Literature

Hassan Al-Momani

Abstract


The current study aims at contrasting the notion of marriage in the nineteenth-century American literature with that of the pre-Islamic Arabic literature. To conduct the study, the marriage advice given by the mother (Marmee) in Alcott's Little Women will be compared with Umama Bint Al-Harith's in the pre-Islamic era to see how women in both literatures view marriage and the status of womanhood in their own cultures. A close reading contrastive analysis will be implemented on both pieces of advice to see how the culture influences the mothers' notion of marriage in both texts. The study concludes that although the notion of marriage is similar in both literatures, it is different due to the cultural effect on women's perception of their status in their cultures of their relationship with men.

 


Keywords


women's status, submission, marriage, mother's advice, domestic sphere, companionship, partnership, obedience

Full Text:

PDF

References


Alcott, L.(1998). Little Women. Oxford: Oxford University Press

Azizmohammadi, F.& Kohzadi, H. (2011). "Familial Relationships in Alcott and Oates's Literary Works." Australian Journal of Basic and Applied Sciences, 5 (12): 2335-2338.

Baym, Nina, gen. ed. (2013). The Norton Anthology of American Literature. Eighth ed. Vol. A. New York: Norton, Print.

Daniele, D. (2015). "Domestic Wounds: Nursing in Louisa May Alcott's War tales." European Journal of American Studies, 10 (1): 1-16.

Fetterley, J. (2009). "Little Women: Alcott's Civil War." Children's Literature: Classic Texts and Contemporary Trends, edited by Heather Montgomery and Nicola J. Watosn, London: Palgave Macmillan.

High, P. (1986). An Outline of American Literature. New York: Longman Inc., Print.

Hodgson, L. (2009). "Transatlantic Little Women: Louisa May Alcott, the Woman Writer and Literary Community." 49th Parallel, 23:1-14.

Masarwah, N. (2013). "Marriage in PreIslamic Arabia as Reflected in Poetry and Prose: The Social and Humane Relations Between Husband and Wife." Sociology Study, 3 (11): 847-857.

Parille, K. (2009). "'Wake up, and be a man': Little Women, Laurie, and the Ethics of Submission." Children's Literature: Classic Texts and Contemporary Trends, edited by Heather Montgomery and Nicola J. Watosn, London: Palgave Macmillan.

Shehab, A. (1992). Women, Islam and Modernity. Dissertation: University of London.

"The Advice of Umama to her daughter." Trans. by Sabrina Al-Oukla. www.naseemalsham.com. Web. Feb. 12, 2007.

Wadsworth, S. (2009). "Louisa May Alcott and the Rise of Gender-Specific SeriesBooks." Children's Literature: Classic Texts and Contemporary Trends, edited by Heather Montgomery and Nicola J. Watosn, London: Palgave Macmillan.

Watson, N. (2009). "Introduction." Children's Literature: Classic Texts and Contemporary Trends, edited by Heather Montgomery and Nicola J. Watosn, London: Palgave Macmillan.

Wester, B. (2005) "At Home We Work Together": Domestic Feminism and Patriarchy in Little Women. Diss. Florida State University.




DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7575/aiac.ijclts.v.5n.1p.65

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.




Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

2013-2019 (CC-BY) Australian International Academic Centre PTY.LTD.

International Journal of Comparative Literature and Translation Studies

You may require to add the 'aiac.org.au' domain to your e-mail 'safe list’ If you do not receive e-mail in your 'inbox'. Otherwise, you may check your 'Spam mail' or 'junk mail' folders.