Hyponatremia And Disability, Prevalence And Prognosis In Babol Stroke Patients.

Alijan Ahmadi Ahangar, Bahareh Bazuiar, Payam Saadat, Tahereh haghshenas, Hamed Hosseinzadeh, Roughaie Mortazavinezhad, Sekine Faraji, Samaneh Hosseinalipour, Shayan Alijanpour

Abstract


Background: Stroke is the leading cause of serious long-term disability. In recent studies hyponatremia as a risk factor for stroke.

Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study was to evaluate serum zinc level in serum sodium over the first 24 hours after the onset of stroke. Different intensities were determined on Stroke Scale NIH (National Institute of Health) (mild 4-1) and (average moderate 15-5) and (moderate to severe 20-16) and (extreme severe 42- 21). Determination intensity of stroke after admission and discharge with Modified Rankin Scale and Barthel index. Blood serum concentrations of sodium 0.5 mL of venous blood were taken and sodium serum level was performed with Latex particle agglutination test in Ayatollah Rouhani Hospital. That normal range was defined 136-146 meq / L

Findings: 125 patients were entered into this study; the prevalence of hyponatremia in female was 70% vs 60% in male. Of stroke patients included in this study 66% of them had hyponatremia and the frequency of hyponatremia in ischemic and hemorrhagic was 82% and 63%, respectively. Increase in hyponatremia with disability period of admission had statistically significant (10(12) mild vs 40(32) moderate, 32(25.6) severe, p=0.01) also with disability before discharge (24(19.2) mild, 26(20.8) moderate, 32(25.6) severe, p=0.03).

Conclusions: Hyponatremia can effect on severity of the stroke and can be considered as a predictor of increased stroke severity and disability at admission and discharge.

 

 

 

 

 


Keywords


Stroke, Risk factors, Hyponatremia

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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7575/aiac.abcmed.ca1.11

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